I guess before I speak on the benefits of training and working out, I should start with the differences between the two. In my opinion, training is the time alloted to make a significant change in not just muscle size and shape, moreover, changes within the motor pattern, while working out being more dedicated to the former. Or in other words, being in ‘gym’ shape vs ‘life’ shape. I can spend this entire post getting more in depth with each of these concepts, and in a future post I will devote more information on how to better define them for you. However, at this time I’d like to express the benefits in keeping both of them a part of your fitness routine.

It continues to be seen that several thousands of dollars are being spent on fitness modalities ranging from gym memberships to last nights’ infomercials and there is probably no end of either of these in sight. I am not here to avert you in purchasing either of these because far be it from me to tell anyone they can’t spend their money on what they want or feel they need. What I would like to do is give you a better idea on what you are purchasing and to maximize the dollar you will be spending.

I used to tell my clients that a gym membership will not get them in shape rather using the membership will. What’s more, when you get there, what is it you want to do? First, why did you invest in the membership in the first place? From my gym employee experiences, most customers were searching for the answers to weight loss and increased muscle mass with cardio and aerobic classes not too far behind. Still, what is it that they wanted to accomplish with these? These will all differ from one to the next depending on several factors so for the sake of simplicity, we’ll focus with the beginner fitness enthusiast. If you’re just starting to exercise, then all will be productive ways of spending your time at the gym. As you begin to progress and are looking for further transformation, slight changes in your approaches to them can help you to see that through. For example, you can simply modify the FITT (frequency, intensity, time, and type) principle and if you feel your body has adjusted to the 60 minute aerobic class, then you can increase the intensity and cut your time down to half and do a ‘tough’ 30 minutes. Or if you have only been using machines as your resistance tools, then adding in dumbells, kettlebells, and medicine balls can provide another level of intensity that your body must now adapt to. If you’re a beginner, then a weighted medicine ball in your hand can feel very different. There will be a learning curve you will go through to better handle the new tool and a training opportunity will have presented itself. You have trained yourself to use the new tool and have also added more variety into your workout.

To summarize, working out and training go hand in hand and they should be looked at as favorable moments of creating a better you. In part 2 of this post I will express more examples of the FITT principle to the specific tools one may choose to use. Until then, go play and have some fun.
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Daniel J Sanidad