What came first, your guilt or the snack?

I find it interesting how the snack industry markets their products.  We are sent a very mixed message when told that we are now allowed to indulge in a guilty snack.  Mostly because either the fat has been lessened, the portion has been controlled, and/or something has been added to make it taste better, even when the ingredients don’t list like it should.   However, what I find interesting is not the fact that they have suddenly allowed us to indulge in a guilty pleasure.  What I do find interesting is that we are told we should feel guilty about the foods we put into our mouths.

Guilt.  Such a strong word.  A word that should not be associated with food.  Guilt may have its place when used with over consumption of food, and is exactly why it should not be associated with marketing food.  That marketing message can easily be misinterpreted and may ultimately allow a person to over consume simply because of how the marketing language gets received.

(Those reasons can become quite complicated to explain here.  I won’t cover those why’s in this post, however, I will follow up on them in another SanitiyFS post.)

A healthy eating approach has nothing to do with guilt.  Once we remove guilt from the equation, we have nothing to think about except all that surrounds a healthy eating habit.  Take note, I said “think about”.  My  suggestion to you is to not let the snack company remove you from your thinking process of your eating experience.  Mindless eating is what leads to over consumption.  And once that becomes one’s eating habit, it is also an incredibly hard one to break.

Learn to sit down and ‘unsnack’.  Or in other words, chew and eat your meal.  If you are hungry, then learn to go through the actions of setting up an entire meal.  If you are that hungry, then the effort will not be a chore.  The eating experience is something we all must learn to move back toward.  A connection to how we feel when we are full and hungry allows us to have better control of our personal levels of consumption.  You train yourself to eat when you are hungry.  And, more importantly, stop when you are full.

It is also important to recognize that one’s eating experience is a large part of who we are as humans.  It can be a healthy social interaction.  It helps us to connect to our heritage.  And it reminds us of the important balance of and between each meal, and everything we consume.

Follow the signs,

Coach Sanity