Category: Training Designs


With a market of filled with fad fitness, it can be difficult to know what to follow.  I believe your time spent on a plan that increases both strength and resilience is essential for long term health.   These returns are built with proper movement and these three simple rules:

a.  start with easy

b.  listen (feel) for danger

c.  go back to a. when needed

Bring attention on you breath and focus on your chosen exercise.  Use your exercise time on movements that gain strength, and allow the productive results to arrive.

 

Start & Finish Position- Isolated Hip Squat

Start & Finish Position- Isolated Hip Squat

 

photo-23

Standing Parallel Squat – Straight Back. Knees align with toes. Head is in line with spine.

 

Example Workout Progression: 

  •  Kneeling Squat – 3 sets/15reps
  • Parallel Standing Squat – 4 sets/10reps
  • Jump Squat – 2 sets/2o reps
  • Superset – Squat/Jump Squat – 3 sets/15 reps (each)

Build an active lifestyle with consistent practice.

Simple. Significant. Sanity!

Coach Sanity

 

Simple tools.  Significant movement.

Simple tools. Significant movement.

Our excitements run high of adding  new activities through out each year.  Remember, life is a long marathon, not a sprint, and the better we prepare ourselves to enjoy each and every day, the more we can enjoy ALL the rewards.

Before you embark on your next activity (a run. a class. a lifting session. etc.) be sure to take a little time to prepare your body for proper recovery.  Aside from a proper warm-up, healing from the stresses of exercise can begin once you have finished today’s sweat session.  It is also a nice habit to make recognizing that your body can only continue to provide you what you will give it back.  In other words, take care of it, and it will be there for you when you need it.

A few simple actions you can use for recovery are:

  • self myofascial release techniques
  • passive or static stretching
  • short stages of meditation/breathing

I have found that a after my fitness training sessions with a few minutes spent on a tennis ball for my feet, some simple stretches, followed by 10 minutes of meditation can do wonders for longevity.  We all love playing this game of life.  And the better we treat our opportunities to savor our experiences, the more we open ourselves up to take in each colorful rain drop we call today.

To our health, Salud!

Let’s play,

Coach Sanity

Strength training articles have been written for years, and so, our practice has traveled from all corners of the fitness continuum supporting sporting activities ranging from weekend warriors, to minutes shaved from of a mile, to strokes removed to find us further under par.

I am writing this post specifically to educate about the training for a life filled with activity.  I have found where most people fall short is not recognizing their opportunity to rehearse, and thrive, within life’s activities.  A large part of this is not personal fault, rather, a commitment of time spent on a mass market of fitness filled with draining activities that sacrifice quality for quantity.  Strength training for life is allowing for a practice of progress found in progressive training.  Like goal strategy, this is intentionally planned and modified.

Where other mistakes are found is not knowing what is wanted in return for the time spent under a barbell.  Without knowing your take away product, the value  of the benefits begin to decline, and when we find ourselves short of long term results.  A few valuable benefits found in strength training are:

  • injury prevention
  • bone density increase/maintenance
  • long term weight management
  • mind focus
  • a sense of resilience

These benefits only continue to improve, as we challenge through periods of progressive strength training protocols.  Furthermore, I have found one of the most valuable benefits my clients take away with them from my strength training prescriptions is an improvement of their ‘in the moment’ thinking.  I value it as an increased ability of (RAISE ) React Accordingly In Stress Environments.

We tend to use a large amount of our human ability to recover from stress when we overreact to the happenings of daily living.  Your staying power can be found within the results of personal progression of the movement patterns our bodies were designed to do since the beginning of existence.  In the gym, they fall under weighted squats, deadlifts, over head pressing/pulling, throwing and hurling, and jumping/landing.  Simple movements done with progressive overloads, to test the human systems of tolerating heightened amounts of stress.

Seek value in the movements that change your life for the better, and spend more 0f your lifetime doing the activities that  make you smile.

Play now, live longer

Coach Sanity

Front desk, locker room, cardio machine, etc.  It amazes me that so many people walk into the gym for their workout, and tend to travel the same route they did the day before.  Here are 3 tips I suggest to stop the insanity of living the same as you did yesterday.

1.  Wear a bright color around the area of your body you want to focus on for that day’s session.

When you look into the mirror, your eyes can focus in on the bright color around your mid-section, arms, or butt (for example), and you can better ‘connect’ to that area, and maximize every single repetition you do.

2.  Take a dry erase marker with you, and before you leave your car, write out on your window your word of accountability.

I love writing things down.  It makes them so much more real than simply keeping them floating around in my head.  The next time you head to the gym, write out one word you absolutely know will hold you accountable to your workout.  We all need reminders ;) For example:

  • name of your child
  • date of your wedding
  • color of your new bikini
  • the name of the guy/girl you have a date with on Saturday

3.  Focus on one thing, and one thing only

Most people go into the gym and dance around the entire area doing several machines and free weight exercises.  I suggest at least once a month you go into the gym to focus on one movement.  Spend at least half the amount of time you would normally spend, and perfect this one movement you have chosen.   Take the time to warm-up as if you were doing your regular workout, however, take this time to also focus on the muscles you will use for this one movement.  Don’t be surprised if you feel more sore than you have felt in quite some time.

 

Follow the signs,

Coach Sanity


I recently went to Las Vegas to partake in a few festivities that fall under the words, Bachelor and Party. I was one of 9 gentleman who raged a full weekend on activities that speak the language of unhealthy and highly stressful. As you know, what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas, and this post is not about what transpired over the 48 hours of gluttony. Rather, it is about the steps I took to ensure not coming home completely annihilated. AKA, shit faced!

Summary – My suggestions for sustaining a weekend of sins in Las Vegas are as follows:

Some down/quite time, thirty minutes of natural sunlight, sip on fluids, chew slowly during meals with a good solid protein source before and after your partying begins.

Day one: I had to work Friday morning and was up at 4:30. Which means I had been up for almost a full day by the time I got to sleep in Vegas, post a few clubs and some fine dining. I fell asleep around 3:30 a.m. and awoke around 8 a.m.

I hit the pool side for 30 minutes of natural sun therapy. I wanted to stay long enough to break a nice sweat.  Once that happened I began to sip water slowly and continued for a few more hours. I also had a nice size lunch (Turkey burger) a long with some Sprite for the carbonation. Later, I was back in my room for a short nap away from the hot desert sun. I then went back down to the casino area for a cocktail. After all, I was on a weekend get a way, and I also feel it is good to have a little bit of hair off the dog that bit your head off. Needless to say, I felt very relaxed and ready for another night of raging in Vegas!

Day two: By the time we got back to the hotel this time, it was 6 in the morning. We headed straight to Cafe Bellagio to have breakfast. I ordered Eggs Benedict and water. Again, on vacation and wanted something I would usually not eat at home, as well as eat some healthy egg protein.

I slept for about 4 hours and jumped right into the shower. I slowly started to pack for my flight home, and continued to relax in my room until our noon checkout. At the airport, I got a black coffee and more water. Didn’t finish the coffee, but did drink the water over the course of the entire flight. I also asked the flight attendant for some ice.  I felt some ice cold water would also be useful to help continue to cleanse.   I also ate the two small bags of peanuts they give out for some salt, and that was all I had until Sunday dinner with family. I crashed about 10 p.m. and woke up Monday morning for work at 5:30.

Day three: I got to work and went right to business with e-mails, clients, meetings, etc. I fasted all morning (just sipped coffee and water) and an hour weight lifting session around noon. I just ate my first meal of the day (3:30 p.m.), and must say, am feeling nice and relaxed while I type this post.

As far as I’m concerned, life is all about a wonderful balance.  And the ability to enjoy the entire experience is where sanity is all about!

Follow the signs,
Coach Sanity

Each and every one of my posts are written with the intention to simplify what was once uncomplicated and pure.  In the beginning, the passage of fitness training was gluttony free of silly toys and jumbo sized pieces of equipment.  It was once a simple place, and only your challenging experience awaited to be measured.

Now we are flooded with intentional distractions.  Appliances labeled as fitness tools soak up inches of primary real estate in gyms across the globe in hopes that they can sell you an opportunity to find a new you and a new look.  Which ones work?  Which ones work better?  Which one fits me?  Do I need all of them?  Just a sample of a number of questions that float around the four corners of your gym.   And a long with them, a number of mediocre fitness trainers simply selling a cookie cutter they call fitness.

I am here to tell you that there a lifetime of results existing amongst the most nutritionally fitness dense tools available on the market.   In this case, the biggest rewards do come in the smallest packages.  Below is a list of tools I feel are the most efficient way to spend your time in harnessing your fitness potential.

1.  Body weight

2.  Medicine Ball

3.  Dumbbell

4.  Barbell

5.  Kettlebell

Supplement(s)

6.  Bands

7.  Ropes

8.  Rowing Ergometer

9.  Variable resistance machines

Each allow freedom of movement and room to explore.  Taking your time to master  the skill of maneuvering these simple tools is your license to walk the path of extraordinary.   How does one master something so free?  You learn to flow, and follow the signs.

Coach Sanity

DONE WORK!

 

Time is made.

We all share one model commodity and that commodity is time. Twenty four hours is the make up of one day. What differs from one to the next is how the day gets spent. Something I have learned through fitness and what I am wanting to share with you is that time is not found, it is made. And through fitness, I learned how to produce more time.

First, a back story. When I started exercising years ago, I spent up to 3 hours a day in the gym. I, like a lot of people, felt that in order to achieve the results I was wanting, I had to spend a lot of my precious minutes in the gym to have it happen. What I discovered over the years was eventually that was not the case. The answers did not lie in the minutes spent on randomness, moreover, it was spent on specifics. And the specifics were the **Big Moves, that accomplished a lot more for the time spent doing them.

I realized I was spending 180 minutes a day, and only walking away with 10% of the health and fitness benefit. As you can see, not a very wise investment. When I later changed my focus, and spent 45 – 60 minutes on the big moves, I was walking away with 100% of a productive amount of time spent. Mostly because the exercises themselves require a focus and a plan, and in return, a stronger foundation to establish everything else above it.

What this means in the real world is that in order to be productive, one’s mental focus should first be spent on the frame (foundation) of what it is you are wanting to successfully achieve. And only then, spend the rest of the time filling in the created spaces on the necessary details.

So many people spend way to much time on the tiny details, when the focus should be on the model of how to spend the hour, and simply allow the minutes to play out in the direction they must go. In short, line them up and press play!

Follow the signs,

Coach Sanity

**Big Moves – Whole body exercises that demand an entire body to have attention. Aka: focus
For example: Squat, Deadlift, Pull-up, Overhead Press, Power Clean, Clean and Press, and Snatch
All the above exercises have regressions for a beginner to also enjoy launching their fitness success!

The goals:

1.  Come in under two hours (last year came in at 2 hr 07 min).

2.  Post race, body feel strong (aside from muscle soreness); low joint pain, low inflammation (last year and the previous year I felt pretty inflamed)

 

The plan (brief description):

Increase strength training (basic full body movements, progressive overloads), increase both aerobic capacity and conditioning (rowing machine was dominantly used, some track work, and distance runs no longer than 30 – 45 mins)

sidenote: send me an e-mail daniel@sanityfs.com if you want more information on my plan for this race

Reflection:

First and foremost, we as adult humans think obsessively.  And not only that, we think little about what can go right and spend more time  on what can possibly go wrong.  I say possibly because half the time nothing has gone wrong yet, however, the mind begins to drift and before you know it, the wrong is now in front of you.

Thank goodness I knew this and approached my training very differently.   I always kept the plan simple, so all I had to do was work hard.  I taught my central nervous system to be resilient and with that, let my mind stay at peace.  I found my mind drifting between miles and steps, however, also recognized that one foot continued to go right in front of the other and all I had to do was relax and trust I chose the right plan to get the job done.

You see, a 13.1 mile run could be a fun Rock n Roll Half Marathon, or it can be a run for your life in fear of danger or harm.  Either way, your body will react to the current environmental conditions you find yourself within.   I could have stressed my body out, ran like my life depended on it, and finished (maybe) a few minutes sooner.  I chose to let my training speak for itself, and ran with the intent to stay as relaxed as possible.  The end result, I finished 17 minutes faster than I did last year, AND, did not pound my body to the ground for that eighteenth minute.  And being as experienced as I am when it comes to professional training, I will make that minute up the next time because my body knows I love it that much ;)

Simply put, whether it be a half marathon, full marathon, triathalon, etc., the steps you take to move further can either accelerate you forward or hinder your progressive movement.  You decide if you want to work smarter and not harder.  I choose smarter (and hard enough) to fully maximize each day I will have lived because today is the reward and the memories will be shared tomorrow.

A Sanity approach,

Daniel J Sanidad/Coach Sanity

As most of you already know, I write about maximizing experiences.  To grasp every opportunity present allowing yourself to experience each moment and make it your own.  Is this possible?  I think, yes.

We start by giving us a name, SanityFS athletes.  Our discipline is in the art of MME or Multiple Mixed Experiences.  The name implies that there will be several happenings constantly around you.  The task is to be mindful of them and make them possibilities for you.  But first, beginning with owning one thing each for mind and body.  Your mind must be open and your body must be adaptable.  In other words, remain fluid.

One’s fluidity is the ability to hold a suppleness.  No additional stress, no further tension.  This requires a very different intent to your  daily exercise.  A coach prescribes an exercise for very specific reasons.  The prescription must fit the demand of the goal and be able to adapt to when the goal is asked to change.  In science, we have cycles, in layman’s terms we have short and long term goals.  For me, it is a balance between both, with an emphasis on an ability to change the short term to fit the long term.  That is a SanityFS athlete.  An ability to recognize a distraction and react accordingly, so to allow for forward movement.  The language between the mind and body is always effective and efficient.  Time no longer gets wasted.  It is spent on a maximal return for each investment.

As a coach, I would suggest to recognize that there are, and will be, distractions around you.  Some are necessary and still many are not.  Which one is which is for you to decide.  What was the long term goal?  Are you still heading in that direction.  Recognize that the environment you are within must:

a. reflect you

and b. support the direction you are going

if either of these are missing, we lose efficiency and gain distractions.  Like seeks like, but first be cognizant of what you like, and obviously don’t like.  What are we here to enjoy?  The open road ahead or the madness of would of, could of and should of.

A Sanity Approach,

Daniel J Sanidad

 

Previously I wrote a post to briefly explain a need in rewording the saying, People can’t change.  I stated, One can not force a change because life will take care of that on it’s own.  Having said that, I’m here to offer you your first opportunity for a life change.  You interested?  Here it is:

How do you want to do today?  For example:

6:00 a.m. Wake up

6:15 a.m.  Shower

7:00 a.m.   Work

1 :00 p.m.  Lunch

6:30 p.m.   Workout

8:00 p.m.   Dinner

10:00 p.m.  Sleep

This may be a typical day for someone, however, not truly answering how you want to genuinely experience today.

Another example:

5:45 a.m.   Wake up

I will spend 15 minutes doing something that will add to my  dinner experience tonight.

6:00 a.m.  15 minutes of Yoga

6:15 a.m.   Shower

6:45 a.m.  Park further and take 15 minutes to walk into work (the goal is to experience  fresh air, new faces, something different)

7:00 a.m.  Work

1:00 p.m.  Lunch (w/a vital friend)

6:30 p.m.  Workout (Solo mission. Take some time to reflect on your day)

8:00 p.m.  Dinner (Yay, been looking forward to this since you woke up this morning.  What did you decide to experience?)

10:00  p.m.  Sleep  (Wow, what a day)

Which day would you prefer to add to your life?  Now I ask again, How do you want to do today?  I’ll take memorable experiences coupled with good conversation, sweat, and laughter please.

 

A Sanity approach,

Daniel J Sanidad

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